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Railroad Books and DVD's

The history books and DVD's produced by Cam-Tech Publishing are much more than just a group of photos and captions.  They bring the story to life with text, photos, maps and illustrations.

You may order books on-line by simply clicking on the Add to Cart button.  If you wish to order via mail, a mailing address appears at the bottom of this page, add $4.50 for shipping.    Dealer inquiries welcome.

 

The Lincoln Funeral Train

 

CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO GO TO A SPECIAL PAGE

Author: Scott D. Trostel.  Acclaimed as an extraordinary historic narrative recounting the thirteen day National Funeral Journey for Abraham Lincoln. This is the story of the nation's first national funeral, retracing the Lincoln Funeral Train from Washington, D. C. to Springfield, Illinois, 1,700 miles. Millions of mourners gathered along the margins of the railroad tracks. In raw, cold, chilly winds, and rain, in the dark of night, millions of people witnessed the Lincoln Funeral Train.

Laced with 143 photos, maps and illustrations this is a revealing story of the funeral cortege passing through endless miles of mourners, making unplanned stops for brief memorials. Citizens placed wreaths on the coffin, sung dirges, hymns, decorated memorial arches and made other public gestures of sorrow. An overwhelming manifestation of public grief showed popular appreciation for the President.

Each chapter covers one day of the journey and proceedings at each of the eleven planned memorial services conducted en route. Elaborate preparations and massive processional displays were conducted at the principal cities of Baltimore, Harrisburg, Philadelphia, New York City, Albany, Buffalo, Cleveland, Columbus, Indianapolis, Chicago and burial at Springfield, Illinois. Citizens seeking a glimpse of the slain president came in throngs and filled miles of city streets. Near riots ensued at some locations in the effort to honor the remains.

The overwhelming response of a nation during the sorrowful journey stands among extraordinary observances of the death of a Statesman. These momentous events form one of the most intensely impressive chapters of American history.

This book is one of the first to cover new and unexplored history of Abraham Lincoln. It is a fascinating recounting of the 1,700 mile journey and national funeral for Abraham Lincoln in 1865. Conducted over the railroads, this text details preparations, the eleven national funerals en route, and many trackside ceremonies. The logistics included passage over 22 railroads and two street railways involving 42 locomotives, approximately 80 pieces of passenger equipment and ferry moves.

 

THE LINCOLN FUNERAL TRAIN    www.lincolnfuneraltrain.com
Scott D. Trostel
224 pages | 8 1/2 x 11 | photos | illustrations.
Soft Cover | ISBN 978-0-925436-21-4 | $34.95

The Lincoln Inaugural Train

CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO GO TO A SPECIAL PAGE

The fascinating story of Abraham Lincoln's epic journey to Washington in 1861 with many new details.. Departing from Springfield, Illinois, millions of supporters of the Union gathered along the margins of the railroad tracks and pack parade routes at cities enroute. In raw, cold, chilly winds, and rain, millions of people cheered Lincoln as he passed by traveling to his final destiny.

Laced with photos, maps and illustrations this is a revealing story of the inaugural train passing through endless miles of well-wishers and the curious. Numerous stops were made, and brief speeches offered. Citizens demonstrated an overwhelming manifestation of support as cecession started in the southern states and a confideracy was formed.

Each chapter covers one day of the journey, reception and proceedings at each of the eleven planned stops enroute. Elaborate preparations and massive processional displays were conducted at the principal cities of Indianapolis, Cincinnati, Columbus, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Buffalo, Albany, New York City, Trenton, Philadelphia and Harrisburg. A twelfth planned stop at Baltimore, was canceled during a clandestine security move to avoid an assassination attempt, the third of three while enroute. Citizens seeking a glimpse of the President-elect came in throngs and filled miles of city streets. Near riots ensued at several locations in the effort by the masses to see and hear the President-elect.

The overwhelming response of a nation during this terrible transitional time stands as a tribute to the courage of one man and the 36 million citizens during momentous events in one of the most intensely impressive chapters of American history.

THE LINCOLN INAUGURAL TRAIN
Scott D. Trostel
190 pages | 8 1/2 x 11 | photos | illustrations.
Soft Cover | ISBN 978-0-925436-67-2 | $34.95

Baldwin: Fifty Years at Eddystone Vol. 1

Click on the cover image to be taken to the Baldwin Locomotive Works Eddystone web site.

This volume is the first of two that explores The Baldwin Locomotive Works at its massive facilities in Eddystone, Pennsylvania. Baldwin is synonymous with steam railroad locomotive construction. It was a single site manufacturing plant until the upturn of business in 1906, when expanded foundry and machining capacity became necessary. Instead of attempting to buy ground somewhere in the immediate Philadelphia neighborhood and build another multi-story building, they bought the abandoned Gunsen Iron Foundry at Eddystone, Pennsylvania, twelve miles south. The foundry and 180 acres of pasture land comprised the first modest investment in what would become a 600 acre manufacturing complex. It was a gem in a highly concentrated manufacturing center on the Delaware River.
Baldwin practiced vertical integration manufacturing long before that phrase was ever trendy. At differing times they owned all the raw materials, all the necessary manufacturing via steel mills, and fabrication plants to produce every single component for a locomotive. Eddystone itself was first expanded in significant ways at the start of WW I as a defense plant to handle military needs including munitions, rifles, bullets, shells, canons, specialty guns and canons plus non-rail vehicles such as army trucks. With the union situation at the Broad Street plant and its limitations of physical size, at the end of WWI the managers thought it more prudent to shift all production into the empty defense plant buildings at Eddystone during the 1920s.

Baldwin: Fifty Years at Eddystone
Volume 1               

Scott D. Trostel
152 pages | 8 1/2 x 11 | 73 photos | 55 illustrations.
Soft Cover | ISBN 978-0-925436-65-8 | $27.95

Building A Lima Locomotive

The Steam Locomotive Construction Process of Lima Locomotive Works during 1924

Click on the cover image to be taken to the Lima Locomotive Works web site.

Author: Scott D. Trostel. Here is an extraordinary window into what smokestack America was all about.  The author takes you on a tour of a heavy manufacturing plant that built steam railroad locomotives in the year of 1924. He uses maps, large photos and illustrations to help one to understand the lost art of commercial railroad locomotive manufacturing at Lima Locomotive Works.

BUILDING A LIMA LOCOMOTIVE
Scott D. Trostel
88 pages | 8 1/2 x 11 | 52 photos | 18 illustrations.
Soft Cover | ISBN 978-0-925436-05-4 | $22.95
      

 

The Detroit, Toledo & Ironton Railroad

Henry Ford's Railroad

Author: Scott D. Trostel. This is a comprehensive history of a key Ohio railroad spanning 130 years. This book is a lesson in the complexities of the railroad corporation from the earliest days up through 1982. Expertly written and highly acclaimed..  This is a must-have book for every historian and any student of railroad history.

THE DETROIT, TOLEDO AND IRONTON RAILROAD
Scott D. Trostel
312 pages | 8 1/2 x 11 | 348 photos | 22 illustrations.
Hard Cover | ISBN 978-0-925436-02-3 | $59.95
      

Henry Ford: When I Ran the Railroads

A Chronicle of Henry Ford's Operation of The Detroit, Toledo & Ironton Railroad (1920-1929)

Author: Scott D. Trostel. A unique history of Henry Ford's railroad enterprises from 1920 to 1929. See how the automotive giant thrust the bankrupt Detroit, Toledo and Ironton Railroad into the forefront of technology and innovation.  He integrated it into an important part of the automotive assembly line, changed work rules, threw out tradition and produced a highly efficient transportation system.  This is the only non-automotive book devoted to the legacy of Henry Ford.

   

Bradford The Railroad Town

Revised Edition

Author: Scott D. Trostel. This book is the first to explore in-depth, the history of a railroad town - Bradford, Ohio.  From the founding of the railroad, to the establishment of a small railroad construction camp to a major rail center and the abandonment of the railroad, here is a story well worth reading. A revision of Trostel's first book, this book established a standard for local history books and brought a new focus to the railroad industry and the Pennsylvania Railroad.

BRADFORD THE RAILROAD TOWN
Scott D. Trostel
154 pages | 8 1/2 x 11 | 150 photos | 14 illustrations.
Soft Cover | ISBN 978-0-925436-00-9 | $34.95

The Dayton & Troy Electric Railway

As the 20th century opened, so did the rapid rise of interest in the systems of mass transit along the northern Miami Valley. It was a sign of progress right along side the invention and use of electric generation. It was in 1888 that the progressive industrialists at Piqua first conceived the idea of an electric street railway, which was virtually unheard of. The idea was pressed forward and from it came the Piqua Electric Railway, who began operation along the streets of the City of Piqua in 1890.

Then in 1892 the same group devised the idea to connect the Cities of Piqua and Troy via a second company, the Miami Valley Railway. It too was successful, opening in 1893.

By 1901 proposals were announced almost weekly for the formation of an interurban railway to run through Miami County. It was a group of Dayton businessmen who finally brought reality to the list of proposed electric railways when they began constructing The Dayton & Troy Electric Railway, to connect the City of Dayton with the City of Troy along the Great Miami River Corridor. At Troy it connected with the Miami Valley Railway, this assuring electric railway transportation from Piqua all the way to Dayton.

The enterprise of the D & T Electric Railway leased the Miami Valley Railway in 1902 thus providing seamless service via a single operator and thus began 30 years of continuous passenger operations and an even stronger freight and package delivery business, the like of which have never been repeated.

This is the story of a small electric railway line that was at least 100 years ahead of its time.

THE DAYTON & TROY ELECTRIC RAILWAY
Scott D. Trostel
94 pages | 8 1/2 x 11 | 69 photos | 10 illustrations.
Soft Cover | ISBN 978-0-925436-71-9 | $22.95
 

The Western Ohio Railway

As the 20th century opened, so did the rapid rise of interest in the systems of mass transit. It was a sign of progress right along side the invention and use of electric generation. The Western Ohio Railway was part of a grand plan to connect Cleveland, Toledo and Cincinnati by a line of interurban railways. It was virtually unheard of, but two visionaries from Cleveland embarked upon the project.

The Western Ohio Railway was to connect the Dayton and Troy Electric Railway at Piqua and with the Toledo, Urban and Interurban Railway at Findlay via the important industrial town of Lima.

By 1901 proposals were put forth for the detailed route of the railway. It meant the end of rural isolation and the introduction of electric into the smaller rural villages along with the rural dweller. It was a group of determined businessmen who finally brought reality to the proposed electric railway when they began constructing the Western Ohio Railway, to connect the City of Piqua with the City of Findlay. At Wapakoneta a branch went west to the Grand Lake, and another went south to Minster. At Findlay they connected with the Toledo, Urban and Interurban Railway, making a continuous line to Toledo. Via a trackage rights arrangement, they also operated into Fostoria and Fremont via a subsidiary line, the Fostoria and Fremont Railway, this assuring electric railway transportation from Piqua all the way to Sandusky and Cleveland over the Lake Shore Electric Railway.

The enterprise formed a consortium known as the Lima Route with other lines to assure passengers smooth connections between several towns in Indiana and across Ohio. Thus began 30 years of continuous passenger operations and an even stronger freight and package delivery business, the likes of which have never been repeated.

This is the story of an important electric railway line that was at least 100 years ahead of its time.

THE WESTERN OHIO RAILWAY
Scott D. Trostel
92 pages | 8 1/2 x 11 | 65 photos | 9 illustrations.
Soft Cover | ISBN 978-0-925436-72-6 | $22.95
 

Electric Traction Along The Stillwater

The Dayton, Covington & Piqua Traction Company

The era of the electric railway or "traction" in western Ohio is even more brief on the timeline of history than the days of the Miami and Erie Canal. The Dayton, Covington & Piqua Traction Company was a simple line, just 34 miles long, no branch lines to connect, a small fleet of cars and a unique park unlike most trolley parks of that day, to relax and enjoy the scenic Stillwater River at West Milton, Ohio

Faced with stiff competition, they ran a very tight and prompt service. They encouraged their passengers, and those with freight, in every way they could, it paid off handsomely. Overlook Park was a dazzling success, far outliving the other trolley parks in the region,. It became a shining gem even though it lacked the carnival-type rides of others. It was not unusual to find reports of 4,000 to 8,000 people at Overlook Park on a weekend, The population of West Milton, was only 1,000 total population. Admission to the park was free for those riding on the D C & P. The success of the park was so great that the line invested in two open-air cars, which were used four months years exclusively to transport patrons along the line to Overlook Park.

The motormen and conductors knew their passengers and like-wise, passengers knew the D C & P men. They were respected, so much so that when the line encountered problems during times of heavy snow, residents and businessmen would volunteer to help shovel snow and keep the line open. When the road first encountered financial difficulties, it was the people in the towns they served who formed committees and put plans together to try and save the line, that is how well it was thought of.

Although their freight service was limited in size, they went after every bit of business they could muster from delivery of a pair of shoes to entire car loads of sorted tobacco leaves and even livestock.

The D C & P played a major role in helping the Dayton flood refugees during and after the 1913 flood.

The line was a success until WW I when a strongly socialist government under President Woodrow Wilson, destroyed the financial integrity of many lines with the burdens of excessive taxation and steep freight and passenger tariff increases. People simply could not afford to pay the government imposed rates, thus limited their use of the transportation services. It was too late for many and their salvation was a date with the bankruptcy judge then the final fate with the junk dealer.

Here is the story of one line, The Dayton, Covington & Piqua Traction Company.

ELECTRIC TRACTION ALONG THE STILLWATER

The Dayton, Covington & Piqua Traction Company
Scott D. Trostel
96 pages | 8 1/2 x 11 | 54 photos | 12 illustrations | 12 maps
Soft Cover | ISBN 978-0-925436-75-7 | $23.95

                                                                       

RAILROADS OF WESTERN OHIO IN THE 1913 FLOOD


 

The flood of March 24 - 27, 1913 brought unprecedented destruction across Ohio and Indiana. It was the railroad and interurban railways that felt its power and wrath first. Bridges were wiped out like tooth picks. Embankments were washed away at the blink of an eye. Track was twisted and bent like silk ribbon for hundreds of miles, yet 100 years later, little has been said about the massive destructions as trains were washed away, lives were lost, and thousands of cars were simply destroyed.

Interurban railways or the "trolley" was shut down as tracks were washed out, bridges washed away and power houses silenced as flood waters swept in and snuffed out fires in boilers and filled generator rooms. Transmission poles and line poles were pushed over like drinking straws. In Dayton the network of street car lines was caught at its busy time when flood waters roared through the levee, washing cars off tracks, wrecking others and covering others up to the roof line in torrents of muddy water.

Dayton's largest traditional employer was the famous Barney and Smith Car Company. In one moment, a wall of water roared down on the massive manufacturing complex and it was drowned beneath 14 feet of water. A month later the firm went into receivership, unable to recover from the destructive forces of the flood.

Dayton Union Station became the refuge for over 500 flood victims, marooned for four days. People wonder how anyone came out of that building alive after the flood waters receded.

Railroads of Western Ohio in The 1913 Flood
Scott D. Trostel
96 pages | 8 1/2 x 11 | photos | illustrations and maps.
Soft Cover | ISBN 978-0-925436-74-0 | $23.95

                                                       

Summit Hill The Balloon Route over The Detroit, Toledo and Ironton Railroad

REVISED EDITION


 

This book was produced in 1987 and taken out of print in 1990.  By popular demand it is back in 2013 with a revisions and improved maps and added photos.

The introduction of railroad transportation into the State of Ohio marked a dramatic beginning in the industrial growth period of the state. With the railroad industry could be assured of continuous movement of raw materials and finished goods — something the network of Ohio canals and rivers were unable to do. Railroads could go anywhere that tracks could be laid and they certainly proved it on one isolated stretch of railroad in Roas and Pike Counties of Ohio.

The interests of Springfield, Ohio, industrialists in tapping the high grade supply of coal in Jackson County in the 1870’s prompted the formation of the Springfield, Jackson and Pomeroy Railroad to build a narrow gauge railroad into the coal lands. The small railroad was severely under financed and forced to use donated right-of-way on one stretch of track that by-passed the major City of Chillicothe in favor of isolated and hilly country.

Known as Summit Hill, this area on the railroad was seventeen miles of tight curves, heavy grades and amultiple of horse shoe curves that compared/with the Horse Shoe Curve at Altoona, Pennsylvania, or Rocky Mountain style construction in the west.

The immense beauty of the area was a drawing card for many excursion trains, but it was dangerous and sometimes deadly for railroad men with many wrecks and run-away trains on the Hill. The railroads that operated on it over the years all regarded it as a major obstacle and costly to operate.

There was a quaintness about the twisting and turning of the railroad to get over the hill and in the many small stations that dotted the line along its path, but it all ended in 1982 with abandonment of the line after 104 years of operation as the most dangerous stretch of railroad in Ohio.

Summit Hill The Balloon Route over The Detroit, Toledo and Ironton Railroad REVISED EDITION
Scott D. Trostel
64 pages | 8 1/2 x 11 | photos | illustrations and maps.
Soft Cover | ISBN 978-0-925436-01-6 | $22.95

The Dayton & Western Traction Company

The Dayton and Western Traction Company is a fascinating story of mass-transit in the first half of the 20th century. operating from Dayton, Ohio, to Richmond, Indiana. It was an under-planned and under-financed line. The Winter's family of Dayton, Ohio, purchased the line in 1899, and undertook construction of an extension from Eaton, Ohio to Richmond, Indiana. It quickly became a high successful enterprise moving from a passenger carrying conveyance to a major freight and express hauler. It not only connecting Dayton with Richmond, but Columbus to Indianapolis and via other connecting lines, plus the states of Ohio and Indiana and beyond.

It was leased to the Ohio Electric Railway in 1907 and was the key line connecting the vast Ohio Elelctric empire to its counterpart, the Terre Haute, Indianapolis & Eastern Traction Company at Richmond, Indiana.

It was taken back by the Winters family in 1920 and rebuilt. Times caught up with it in 1931. It was placed in receivership and managed by the Cincinnati & Lake Erie Railroad from 1931 to 1936. It was finally closed by the Indiana Railroad after just 10 months of operation in 1937. It was one of the finest lines to operate in Ohio. 

Roster   Color cover  

The Dayton & Western Traction Company
Scott D. Trostel
94 pages | 8 1/2 x 11 | 96 photos | 10 illustrations and  8 maps.
Soft Cover | ISBN 978-0-925436-76-4 | $24.95

 

DVD's

 

DUSK ON THE PANHANDLE - a DVD of films covering the last days of steam on the Panhandle between Bradford and Columbus, Ohio. For more information and sequence details CLICK HERE

 

 

 

DUSK ON THE PANHANDLE
DVD
Color | Run Time 45 minutes | no sound | $24.95

THE BUILDING OF LIMA SUPER-POWER  This fascinating new DVD documentary is in depth look inside the buildings of Lima Locomotive Works during  the construction of Super-Power, (1925 - 1949).

Follow the Super-Power locomotive manufacturing at the Lima Locomotive Works process from design and engineering through a host of departments from blue print to foundry pattern, and to every corner of the complex as raw steel is formed into the most fascinating machine to ever grace the American industrial scene. From Lima Locomotive Works photos, many never seen before.  This documentary is narrated.

Click on the cover image to be taken to the Lima Locomotive Works web site.

THE BUILDING OF LIMA SUPER-POWER
DVD
Black & White | Run Time 45 minutes | narrated | $24.95

HENRY FORD'S D  T & I RAILROAD 1920 - 1929  A documentary with narration by Scott D. Trostel. From the studio of Neff Video and D T & I Railroad Historian, Scott D. Trostel, comes a unique and fascinating DVD documentary featuring Henry Ford’s movies of the Detroit, Toledo & Ironton Railroad.

From the banks of the Ohio River to the blast furnaces at the Rouge Works, this is a rare look at the D T & I during the Henry Ford years of ownership in the roaring twenties.

 

 

 

 

PLUS BONUS FOOTAGE

• THE FORD WAY OF RAILROADING
• FORD TOURS THE LIMA LOCOMOTIVE WORKS
• STORY OF FORD COAL AND COKE
• MANUFACTURING AT THE FORD MOTOR COMPANY
• MISCELLANEOUS FILM CLIPS AROUND DETROIT

TOTAL RUN TIME: 1 Hour 35 Minutes

SHIPPING STARTS NOVEMBER  3, 2014

HENRY FORD'S D  T & I RAILROAD 1920 - 1929
DVD
Black & White | Henry Ford Run Time, 56 minutes | narrated | plus bonus footage, 39 minutes | $24.95

 

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Fletcher, Ohio 45326-9766

937-368-2489

email: Info@canteenbooks.com