THE OFFICIAL SITE OF RESTORED LIMA CITY STREET RAILWAY MOTORMAN'S COMPARTMENT FOR CAR NUMBER 60

 

The restored motorman's compartment was completed July 21, 2010 and is displayed in the new exhibit hall of the Allen County Historical Society at Lima, Ohio. 

The restoration process on this page depicts the process from storage, to movement for display and the fine mural painted to depict the car interior and a street scene in Lima.

This single truck Birney Safety Car plied the streets of Lima, Ohio from 1923 to 1939.  It was sold for scrap and ended its days in a barn yard east of Lima, Ohio.  The Allen County Historical Society salvaged the motorman's compartment and placed it in long-term storage, where it had been since 1962.  In 2010, after display restoration it went into a new exhibit hall of the Allen County Historical Society at Lima, Ohio. Restoration and painting of the mural backdrop was carried out by Scott Trostel of Fletcher, Ohio.  This is an extraordinary display and well worth the time to view it.

This is the completed restoration of the motorman's compartment of Lima City Street Railway Car Number 60

inside the Allen County Museum on November 1, 2010.

 

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The two photos below are artists renderings depicting the finished restoration, issued in October, 2009.  These were used by the Museum Trustees to determine whether a restoration of the car remains should go forward.

 

This is the car as it sat in long-term storage prior to the start of restoration December 2009.

Below is the bulkhead with the car number visible.

This is the motorman's compartment as it was backed                                 As paint scraping began the last paint scheme was revealed

into the shop on December 23.  Note the extra bracing.                                                        The white stripe is actually silver leaf.

 

The headlight is off, as is the Trolley Catcher frame.

While things are coming off, they are undergoing a thorough dismantling, removal of all paint, and loose reassembly in

preparation for painting. On the left is the Trolley Catcher as removed from the car.  On the right is the same item after

being dismantled and cleaned of all paint.  It is in operational condition. 

 

 

Here's the inside of the car with two panels removed to show the center and right panel and car framing.

The mice had nested here but did not damage the framework.  The sheet metal is primered with a red-oxide.

The headlight was still in place in this photo.

 

 

Most everything is presently gone from the front of the car.  The sign holder frame was taken off the first week of January.  The lower skirt sheet metal

comes off this week.  Next to be replaced will be the rotted left front corner post and then the floor will be replaced.  The new floor will be red oak. 

Window sashes are in the shop being readied for glass.

Here's the brake stand (LEFT) and the controller/reverser (RIGHT) that will go into

the restored motorman's compartment. They are restored and presently in storage at Lima.

 

Here's the underside of the car looking forward towards the coupler pocket.  Some structural components were removed when the

car was sold for scrap.  The car is sitting on a temporary plywood platform visible on the bottom of the photo.

 

Here's the front framing of the car less sheet metal.  One of the horizontal nailers was broken.  It was replaced with a piece of white oak.

Here's a larger view of the front of the car with the sheet metal removed.  A post had rotted at the sill, a new splice was milled and set in. 

Wire brushing of the frame has also begun with the end sill in primer brown.

A lot of progress was made in early February. The three fender skirt nailers were replaced on the front sill.  Above then three new floor stiffeners

were cut and installed.  The window sills were trial fit ad flooring was readied for installation.

 

 

The corner post required replacement.  This is the scene  with the compartment stripped and many of the attaching components hanging free.

The project took about a week to get set-up but only four hours to actually remove the post and insert the replacement.  Reattaching the

components and getting everything back where it belonged took two more days.

 

 

This is the front of the car with the window sills in place and the sheet metal back.  It has been partially stripped of paint and the skirting has been primed.

Note the headlight and trolley catcher are in place and the Number 60 has been temporarily painted on its original location.

 

 

Here's an interior view as much of the original wood work or lack thereof on the left, then on the right as it goes back in, stripped of the

many layers of paint and restained to its original color. A new floor has been laid under the protective rubber mats.

 

 

 

En route to the Allen County Museum July 21, 2010, the trolley is sitting on South Main Street in Lima, as a CSX train approaches.  This street was once its normal route.

 

 

This is the newly installed car inside the Allen County Museum July 21, 2010.  A black skirt will surround the legs, windows are

pending installation and a mural depicting the inside of the car will be painted to the back drop.

 

 

Surprise!  This is a view inside of Car 60, as well as a painting of a typical street scene at Lima in the mid-1920's.  There is no inside

to Car 60, this is a photo of a mural painted on the back wall of Car 60 by Scott Trostel.

 

Here's a close-in view of the painting.

 

 

 

This panel was installed at the Allen County Museum next to the restored trolley.

VISIT THE COMPLIMENT SITE TO SEE PHOTOS OF MOVING OF SHAY 10 INTO THE DISPLAY HALL WHERE THE MOTORMAN'S COMPARTMENT WILL ALSO RESIDE CLICK HERE

 

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